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Document 828

Conversation 19: Two North-East teachers on Doric language

Author(s): N/A

Copyright holder(s): Prof Christian J Kay, SCOTS Project

Audio transcription

M842 Okay Moira, another tough day at the //office. How did ye get on?//
F831 //tut Aye, I ken.// Nae bad, yersel?
M842 Ach, it was awright //ehm, bit of a//
F831 //Good!//
M842 easy day, easy Monday mornin, managed to pencil myself in for ehm two free periods, //periods one an//
F831 //[tut]//
M842 periods two //so//
F831 //Do ye nae get a// please take?
M842 Nae please //takes the day, no I was//
F831 //tut Oh dear!//
M842 eh, doin drama last week so that's my eh, that's my shot o a please takes by I think for the time bein
F831 tut I dinnae ken, you maths department, you never get any please takes.
M842 Aye well, aye, my f-, free time off I'd to see seniors today cause they're kinda panickin about their exams and fit have you.
F831 Your prelim marks awright?
M842 Ehm, aye, some up, some doon, some kids, ye ken, sittin in the class that ye ken are really gonna be strugglin fae the off and eh y- ye basically just got to try and get them into the right section, The last thing you want for them is to pit in a hale year and then find oot that, ye know, they wasted their time //because their, their other//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 grades are gonna suffer //cause they're concentratin on this an//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 an they're gonna get nothin at the end of it.
F831 Mmhm
M842 So I seen them, some o them came in pretty panickin period six //and then//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 I was thinkin' aboot what we were eh gonna dae for this Doric //speakin or//
F831 //spick aboot this// efternuin.
M842 I'm eh sure we've been picked //because we're baith fae the sticks,//
F831 //[laugh]// [laugh] Fae teuchterland! //[laugh]//
M842 //fae teuchterland and ehm of-, well, I suppose there is quite a strong accent we, we've got doon here in Laurencekirk// //but//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 certainly some o the words and stuff I mention, //some o the kids'll//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 look at ye funny.
F831 Aye.
M842 I, I'll tell ye the, the ain that ayeways comes up is h- "haivers". //Ken the kids doon here say//
F831 //Haivers.//
M842 "haivers"
F831 Mmhm
M842 Right, wi me if ye're haiverin
F831 Aye, ye're //speakin//
M842 //B-//
F831 rubbish.
M842 Well //I always thought it was ye were hummin and haein.//
F831 //Or speakin nonsense.// Oh! //Oh it's, aye.//
M842 //Right, I'm, I'm just, you know, I'm haiverin about that.//
F831 //I thought haiverin wis,//
F606 //Mm//
F831 ye're bletherin a heap o nonsense. //Stop yer haivers.//
M842 //Aye well that's, that's, yeah, that's fit// that's fit it's down here but I'm sure when, ye ken, I was growin up my mither would say, "Och, stop yer haiverin!"
F831 Aye. //Yeah. [laugh]//
M842 //Maybe I wis speakin rubbish at the same time but I thought// haiverin was mean, ken, "make yer mind up" or somethin like //that, "get a move on".//
F831 //Aye.// Aye.
M842 But ehm
F831 Well it's certainly nae the same strong dialect doon here though. //It's//
M842 //No.//
F831 tamer
M842 No, I ken. //Aye, yeah.//
F831 //I mean, it's broad.//
M842 I mean the kids, eh, some of the kids, aye, some o the kids try to talk, I mean we've spoken about this, you ken, at lunchtime the day, your phone voice and how ye speak tae the kids, //I mean sometimes//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 ye know if I'm, if I'm addressin them at assembly or somethin like that, there's a lot of them there, then I probably will put on my phone voice. //But in a//
F831 //uh-huh//
M842 classroom cause it's mair relaxed
F831 Aye.
M842 ye, ye, ye ken, I just, I do spick normally. //And sometimes I//
F831 //uh-huh// //[laugh]//
M842 //pit it on cause ye get a laugh an it kin,// //it contributes to the, aye!//
F831 //Certain kids ye kin pit it on wi, aye, uh-huh.//
M842 And ehm [inaudible], one, one lad, ken, he's, he's actually nae long left, ye, ye mind Craig?
F831 uh-huh
M842 He was, he was //a belter, he put it on but it was//
F831 //Aye, he was guid.//
M842 alright, ken //it, it was all//
F831 //uh-huh//
M842 guid an as I say, I think, ye know, ye, ye shouldna really change
F831 No.
M842 who you are. There's a time an a place, ehm, one thing, I mean, I'm c-, if I'm speakin just now, I'm speakin to you, I'm speakin totally different to //if I'm speakin to a//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 a kid, //an I'm very conscious//
F831 //aye, uh-huh//
M842 that when I'm in, ye know, s-s- speakin dialect, speakin yer natural tongue if you like, I'm affa quick.
F831 Aye, a- I re- aye, uh-huh, //yeah, ye do, mmhm.//
M842 //an ye mo-, ye tend tae motor on// an ye know, if you're tryin' tae explain thi-, that's one thing I'm conscious of and as soon as I try an slow down, then that actually changes me an I'm startin, I'm really thinkin aboot //the language I'm sayin and I'm, I'm slowin//
F831 //Uh-huh, aye, yeah.//
M842 down tryin to get my point //across.//
F831 //Uh-huh//
M842 but, ye know, if ye, say if you're speakin to somebody in the department or somebody
F831 Uh-huh
M842 who kens whit it is, there's nae the same need //an as soon as//
F831 //Uh-huh//
M842 I speed up, ye ken, that's fan I, I slip in an I //start//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 ye just kinda start usin
F831 Mmhm
M842 kinda slang
F831 It's different, it's different even in Aiberdeen compared tae far we're fae //[laugh]//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 really cause even in Aiberdeen the words are different and the dialect's different //an it//
M842 //Mmhm//
F831 it's certainly again nae as rough or broad if ye go up to Fraserborough or Peterheid //or up//
M842 //Mmhm//
F831 oor neck o the //woods, it's//
M842 //Aye, broad, broad// is the thing, I mean I, one o the things I was pla- when I was placed ehm ma first placement was up in Buckie highschool and I hink any member of staff goin in there thinks, ye know, there's a bit o aggression aboot the kids //the way they kinda speak//
F831 //Mmhm// //Aye, uh-huh.//
M842 //tae ye, but// because I, I grew up like that an I've lost a bit o my tongue //ehm//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 I mean there's still, ye, ye kinda still pit in //the odd word or like//
F831 //Uh-huh//
M842 you can still ken I've got a Buckie twang
F831 Mmhm
M842 ehm but although ma, ma folks kinda kept it //their//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 tongue a wee bit mair, I didna cause //I was at school//
F831 //No.// //Aye uh-huh//
M842 //ehm// I was growin up wi different folk, playin fitba team, fit hiv ye,
F831 Mmhm
M842 ehm an eventually you kinda, you kinda lost a little bit o it //but eh//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 the bairns up there are, ken, really, really broad.
F831 Aye, an they //kinda sing//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 as weel, like, athing's got "ie" at the //end.//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 Ken, Jeanie, an //Jessie an//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 Annie an everything's "ie" //an it re-.//
M842 //That's it.//
F831 It is kinda singin an //broad.//
M842 //But it was, it was good.// it was good for me cause ye go back and I mean, as I say I, I grew up there and kinda kids are, kids are genuine, an I mean if they're speakin like that some o the times I mean we spoke to them and hear how they put on their phone voice //and ye change, you're like, if they're speakin like that//
F831 //Mmhm, mmhm//
M842 then that, that's what they're maist comfortable //daein an//
F831 //Mmhm, mmhm//
M842 ye're gonnae get mair oot o them, ye know ye, //"Hands up,//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 who can answer?" an such an such.
F831 Aye, if ye kin spick //spick//
M842 //Yeah.// //aye, ex- exactly, an I think that's//
F831 //their lingo as opposed to talk, uh-huh, yeah.//
M842 probably ain o the reasons I was pit up here //cause I wouldna//
F831 //uh-huh//
M842 find it, ye know, I mean the language wouldnae hae been
F831 Mmhm
M842 a barrier //ehm but//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 ye know some o them, affa broad.
F831 How did you find it when you came to Aiberdeen, cause I ken masel that I was really quite broad to start wi, then I started university an I was, university, I had to learn to talk because people wouldn't understand me.
M842 Aye. //I think [cough]//
F831 //An not nec- nae necessarily in a// posh sense but just really like you said //earlier havin to//
M842 //Mmhm//
F831 think aboot whit ye're sayin a the time cause if ye dinna folk look at ye //as if ye've got//
M842 //mm//
F831 twa heids.
M842 I ken well, fan I moved eh, fan I moved oot eh, fan I moved oot o Buckie, eh moved to Ellon which is aboot, och, ten, fifteen mile north o Aiberdeen an it was tough actually comin oot, I mean I moved in primary seven an y-, I dinnae even want to say swearin but swearin was actually more acceptable up in //in Buckie, ye heard your granda an that, the way they, the way they kinda spoke to you. An I was//
F831 //Aye, aye, aye, second word sometimes, aye.//
M842 conscious [laugh] ye know, I was conscious that I, I did actually swear a little bit now for, for, for a primary seven if you like //that was kinda really frowned upon at school an folk, folk would f-f-//
F831 //uh-huh [laugh]//
M842 "Oh, do ye hear what he's sayin" //an everything like that, an I//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 thought I wasnae, ye know I wasnae overly coarse but I think it was maybe just a mixture o that with ma accent //as well, ehm, an it//
F831 //uh-huh, aye, uh-huh//
M842 was quite, it was quite tough. //I mean the kids did say, "Oh we canna,//
F831 //uh-huh//
M842 we canna understand fit ye're sayin". //I think they//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 kent fine fit I was sayin //but//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 it was so different //in a wee//
F831 //uh-huh//
M842 little kinda tight-knit community like that far abodie bides in Ellon a their kinda days //if you like, somebody else comin in//
F831 //Aye, uh-huh//
M842 new, it was, I suppose it was an experience for some o the bairns, //cause they a probably//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 spoke the same.
F831 Aye. //uh-huh//
M842 //So I mean// fit certainly fan I, fan I moved, an as ye're a kid ye're mair conscious o it ehm I did kinda lose it a little bit but I mean in a, in a toon, in Aiberdeen, I suppose ye're meetin a lot mair folk,
F831 Aye.
M842 an there's folk, there's folk shiftin in an it wasna such a, it was, I only moved into toon, ken, four year ago or somethin, //like that.//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 But aye, certainly fan I first came through ehm it was, it was somethin, it was just like an, an, although we're a kinda Scots, if //ye like but it was just//
F831 //Mmhm, aye.//
M842 like an outsider comin in to //"[?]fuckin[/?] fa's//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 he //speakin like that?"//
F831 //But fan ye hear it// like [inaudible] a lassie that ehm I'm pals wi that teaches at a different school, she ehm she's frae Fraserburgh
M842 Aye.
F831 an she nivver "talks", she continually "spicks" a the //time,//
M842 //Mmhm//
F831 to anybody and everybody an s- some folk understand her fair enough even //Aiberdonians//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 understand her to a certain extent but there are some folk she just naturally stops spickin. //Now I used to//
M842 //mm//
F831 think, "Oh my God, I wish she would talk
M842 //Aye.//
F606 //[laugh]//
F831 for goodness sake, naebody understands a word ye're //sayin, an//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 it, ye do, ye have this, emb- nae an embarrassment but ye sometimes feel, ye think, "Oh for the love o God, can ye just speak //properly" as it were,//
M842 //Mmhm//
F831 an we shouldna be daein that, we should be quite be happy tae have ither people tryin to understand fit we're tryin tae say an //okay, the//
M842 //That's it.//
F831 speed thing, ye said that //earlier, it can//
M842 //I'd said, aye, I s-//
F831 be quite quick.
M842 The speed is, aye, the speed is, the speed's [?]away[/?], but I'm forever speakin, stoppin kids doon here, I ken, I quite like it, an if they, they'll say a word that I've nae heard of, ken, //that's//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 athin, I mean, what we were on aboot the day, somebody was on about wedgies.
F831 Wedgies! [laugh]
M842 A wedgie, an I was like, I ken it f- fine fit //a wedgie, it was a//
F831 //uh-huh//
M842 "sid" when we were at //ken, aye, cawed that a sid, ehm//
F831 //A sid? Ah, I hadnae heard o that yin, no.//
M842 but, ye know, I quite, I qu- I quite like it, I speak //be f-//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 be who ye are, I mean there's a time an a place //like we've//
F831 //Aye//
M842 spoken about, ye're tryin to get your point across, ken, //ye need to kinna//
F831 //uh-huh//
M842 kinna slow doon but ehm no, I mean i-, I'm, because I've been exposed tae it and I've went through, ken, a, a change,
F831 uh-huh
M842 ehm a big change in tongue wi the f-, the wey the folk, I mean m- [laugh] even the other way my, my folks used to laugh at me,
F831 uh-huh
M842 cause they were sayin, "Oh //here he, here he comes hame, oh you're talkin like a [?]beaut[/?], yeah, "oh, h-, hallo Clifford" on the phone an.//
F831 //Aye, "Oh here, aye, oh yes", aye, I know, I was the same, my dad [laugh]// my dad would be like, "Oh the city dame's back, oh aye!" //[laugh]//
M842 //Exactly.//
F831 "And far's yer accent?"
M842 Yeah, but I mean k- we've kinda, we've kinda seen it if you like an eh you're used to kinda change so that's probably why I say to the kids, "No, ken, just be who you are an I'm quite happy to //listen to you".//
F831 //mm//
M842 An of course ye kin understand it.
F831 Mmhm //But it's even//
M842 //It's just eh//
F831 different fae far you're fae an far I'm, far I'm //I'm fae.//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 Like, you're f- far more sort o fishin //community,//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 whereas I'm fairm- farmin //community.//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 So the, the dialect even then differs //how, the words that//
M842 //Aye, we're on about, see, we're// on about [?]"gowes"[/?], you're on about "neeps" //an tatties//
F831 //[laugh]// Beasts an everythin. //But even//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 then the dialect's different fae, for example, Buckie to, I dinnae ken, Foggie or Cornhill or //somewhere like that//
M842 //mm//
F831 where it's really sorta hard, sorta rough //soundin//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 and then it kinda, like you say it gets a bit sorta broader even the more in Fraserburgh an //Peterheid wey.//
M842 //Fraserburgh// Fraserburgh and Peterheid's a beauty //cause I m- I m-//
F831 //Mmhm//
M842 I mind watchin, ken, "It'll Be Alright On The Night" or somethin like that //or eh//
F831 //uh-huh//
M842 "TV Bloopers" and there was a guy interviewed a fisherman frae Peterheid. //Now,//
F831 //Aye, uh-huh// //[laugh]//
M842 //I couldna hardly mak oot fit he was sayin an he was just// because it was a hundred mile an //oor an it was//
F831 //Aye, uh-huh//
M842 it was, ye know, relative to, ye know he was on aboot fishin, it was a the, this jargon fishin he was //speakin aboot//
F831 //Aye, uh-huh//
M842 and ehm he didna change his tongue at a //for the TV,//
F831 //No, no.//
M842 and ehm it was just, it was fascinatin, cause sittin like, I'm actually just sittin listenin to him thinkin, "What the hell's he goin on //aboot here?" But//
F831 //[laugh] An// naebody understands it //other than the folk in//
M842 //Exactly.//
F831 Peterheid or //Fraserburgh, aye.//
M842 //Exactly, but a the, a the// beauts an toffs in the toon //woulda been sittin goin, "Fit, fit's, fit's happenin here?"//
F831 //[laugh]// My husband often comes hame, cause he works in Peterheid //an he often comes hame//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 he said to me aince, he goes, "Fit's 'far y'at' mean?",
M842 "Far y'at?"
F831 An I went, "Aye, far y'at" //so then I went, "It means//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 'where are you'", and he went "Everybody keeps goin 'far y'at?'", now he's fae Aiberdeen but somethin again,
M842 Aye.
F831 that's just, you know, thirty miles north and it's completely different, it could be alien to a lot o folk.
M842 My, my best ain was ehm, I used to say, "Nae muckle wunner".
F831 Nae muckle wunner. //Aye.//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 Mmhm //[laugh]//
M842 //Pe-, speakin to kids or somethin like that, "Aye, nae muckle wunner, aye,// //ken, ye cannae dae it, ken, you've no been listenin to fit teacher's been sayin or some-, nae muckle wunner.//
F831 //Aye, aye, Mmhm// //Nae muckle wunner.//
M842 //Like, "Eh?"//
F831 [laugh] //[laugh]//
M842 //But eh it's//
F606 //[laugh]//
M842 it's again, it's, ye ken, ye just dae it without, ye dae it without //ye dae it without//
F831 //uh-huh//
M842 thinkin.
F831 Aye.
M842 ehm, I mean, I've got, I should [inaudible], one o my cousins, ehm, [laugh], two cousins if ye like, eh, Richard, he's eh he's as broad as ye like, //Vicky//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 just talks //aye, talks the talk, aye, an it's just chalk an cheese but it//
F831 //Aye, uh-huh, uh-huh, aye.//
M842 sounds, I think it sounds ridiculous //actually, I think it sounds//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 too pit on.
F831 Aye. //ye have to be//
M842 //Ye know.//
F831 natural aboot it
M842 That's it. //Aye.//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 The last thing ye want to be, it becomes a major chore if you've really got to think.
F831 Think how to //spick.//
M842 //Think how// to speak //when ye know ye've got enough on your mind if ye like, withoot//
F831 //Aye [laugh]//
M842 concentratin, "Hang on, hang on, fit am I, fit am I sayin here?"
F831 It's the odd word here and there though, I still say things like "sat" instead o "salt" //sometimes, aye, "sat"//
M842 //Oh aye, "sat", aye, "sat an pepper"//
F831 //Aye.//
F606 //Mm//
M842 Ehm, "food", ken, ehm, fan I moved through to Ellon it wis ayeweys "mait" //"Ye no gonnae eat yer mait?", Ellen it's//
F831 //Yer mait, aye, uh-huh//
M842 "met"
F831 "Met"? //Mait, aye.//
M842 //I couldnae get ower that.// Definitely "mait" wi us.
F831 Aye. //Again//
M842 //But//
F831 it's just a sort o //variations.//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 If things that are alien to some folk like "semmit" //to some folk,//
M842 //Aye [laugh]//
F831 my Dad ayeweys goes on aboot his semmit in the wintertime an even for a, as a bairn for lang enough I dinnae //ken whit a semmit wis but jist//
M842 //Mmhm, aye.//
F831 things like that that come into conversation, //folk go//
M842 //mm// Sad to say some o it's dyin oot cause I mean, I, well ma granny's nae keepin well jist noo, she, I mean she's through in hospital I've been up visitin her, my grandad just, my grandad's a total star
F831 Mmhm
M842 but there's still some things he think- an I think, "Christ, I havenae heard that for //years". Aye, ye laugh but ye forget it//
F831 //Aye ye laugh though, aye ye do, ye laugh.//
M842 I mean //ye forget it, I mean//
F831 //Aye.//
F606 //Mmhm//
M842 if I'm, we're oot o the area, ken, there's a lot o it's nae gonnae get kinna passed on //an I winnae be passin it//
F831 //uh-huh//
M842 on to
F831 An it is a shame, it's a shame that we laugh cause we shouldnae. //We should bu-//
M842 //Mmhm//
F831 ye laugh because it's comfortin //as opposed to//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 "ha ha" //laugh, it is, it's//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 kinda, sorta, conjures up a yer childhood memories I thinks.
M842 But some, I mean some o the Doric words I mean they're just, they're so descriptive an, they're just, they're just what ye want to //say rather than//
F831 //Mmhm// Things like "glaikit" an
M842 Aye.
F831 //see there's a difference//
F606 //Mmhm//
F831 between, this is, this, I have a, this worry that, far Doric ends an Scots //starts an vice//
M842 //Mmhm//
F831 versa, cause I'm sure there's a lot o words in Doric that come fae, from the Scots origin //that come fae that//
M842 //Aye.//
F831 an we jist kinda make wur ain wee version of them but
M842 Aye I think that, it, it's jist gets changed and ada-, I mean "gadgie", "gadgie"'s a //classic toon//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 word
F831 Aye.
M842 and I've nivver, I'd nivver came //across that,//
F831 //No.//
M842 nivver came across that //up north//
F831 //No.//
M842 ehm but it was aye, it was aye, I was sittin, you know, I'd found, found my local pub in the toon, athin like that an folk were comin in an I was thinkin, "Christ, abody's cawed Gadgie //here!" I had tae say, "Fit's a gadgie"?//
F831 //[laugh]// //Everybody's cawed Gadgie!//
M842 //That'll be the end. They, they certainly took a// laugh at me for nae kennin fit a gadgie wis //but, aye//
F831 //Aye.// //Aye.//
M842 //Ach well, I hink// the, the moral o the story's jist kinda
F831 Jist keep //speakin the Doric//
M842 //jist kinna be yersel, I mean I// I was, we were daein that talent show
F831 Aye, //aye that was funny.//
M842 //Mind? Iain came up an// Iain came up an says, "Come on, really pit it on",
F831 Aye.
M842 But //as ye g- w- exactly, aye.//
F831 //Aye, a phrase that means a [?]sharnie[/?] dubs, aye, it's// like "Scotland the What" aw ower //again! [laugh]//
M842 //I ken, really pit it on, ken [inaudible] my//
F606 //[laugh]//
M842 ma, ma nephew who likes gonnae crease himself, he said, managed to say this word //or somethin, "I've nae got//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 a scooby", I think it //was//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 that he wanted me to say, but eh that was the thing as well, I mean if, ye cannae really put it on.
F831 Nuh.
M842 The mair ye pit it on, it sounds //if ye're//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 tryin too hard //it sounds ridic-, I mean//
F831 //Aye.//
M842 ye jist //as I say, kinda, let it flow, let it flow.//
F831 //Ye jist have tae let it flow, aye, and say words// like "beasts" an "dubs" an it'll be aright! //[laugh]//
M842 //"Dubs" is a belter//
F831 "Dubs" is a //good word, I like 'dubs', aye.//
M842 //"Dubs" is an absolute belter. There was a ni-, there was a// notice in the bulletin last //week. I just re-, I just used//
F831 //Aye! [laugh] Aboot mud.//
M842 to read it oot.
F831 [laugh] "Dubs", did you say //"dubs"? [laugh]//
M842 //Dubs. Dinnae get it oan yer feet an tek it intae schuil.//
F831 As lang as it's nae [?]sharnie[/?] dubs ye'll be //aright! [laugh]//
M842 //Exactly, I ken.//
F831 [laugh] Oh dear.

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Conversation 19: Two North-East teachers on Doric language. 2020. In The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech. Glasgow: University of Glasgow. Retrieved September 2020, from http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=828.

MLA Style:

"Conversation 19: Two North-East teachers on Doric language." The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech. Glasgow: University of Glasgow, 2020. Web. September 2020. http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=828.

Chicago Style

The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech, s.v., "Conversation 19: Two North-East teachers on Doric language," accessed September 2020, http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=828.

If your style guide prefers a single bibliography entry for this resource, we recommend:

The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech. 2020. Glasgow: University of Glasgow. http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk.

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Information about Document 828

Conversation 19: Two North-East teachers on Doric language

Audio

Audio audience

Adults (18+)
For gender Mixed
Audience size 2

Audio awareness & spontaneity

Speaker awareness Aware
Degree of spontaneity Spontaneous
Special circumstances surrounding speech Participants teach in the same school, and come from Doric-speaking areas. Participants were asked to address this topic.

Audio footage information

Year of recording 2005
Recording person id 606
Size (min) 13
Size (mb) 62

Audio setting

Education
Recording venue School staff room
Geographic location of speech Laurencekirk

Audio relationship between recorder/interviewer and speakers

Not previously acquainted
Speakers knew each other Yes

Audio speaker relationships

Professional relationship

Audio transcription information

Transcriber id 631
Year of transcription 2005
Year material recorded 2005
Word count 3743

Audio type

Conversation
Interview
General description Discussion about the use of the Doric

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 606
Gender Female
Decade of birth 1940
Educational attainment University
Age left school 18
Upbringing/religious beliefs Protestantism
Occupation Academic
Place of birth Edinburgh
Region of birth Midlothian
Birthplace CSD dialect area midLoth
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Glasgow
Region of residence Glasgow
Residence CSD dialect area Gsw
Country of residence Scotland
Father's place of birth Leith
Father's region of birth Midlothian
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area midLoth
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's place of birth Edinburgh
Mother's region of birth Midlothian
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area midLoth
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
English Yes Yes Yes Yes All
Scots No Yes No Yes Work

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 831
Gender Female
Decade of birth 1970
Educational attainment University
Age left school 17
Upbringing/religious beliefs Protestantism
Occupation Teacher
Place of birth Inverness
Region of birth Inverness
Birthplace CSD dialect area Inv
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Kingswells
Region of residence Aberdeen
Residence CSD dialect area Abd
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Contractor / Labourer
Father's place of birth Portknockie
Father's region of birth Moray
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area Mry
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's occupation Nurse / Health visitor
Mother's place of birth Turriff
Mother's region of birth Aberdeen
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area Abd
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
English Yes Yes Yes Yes Everyday life, work and home
Scots Yes Yes Yes Yes Doric with parents, relatives, friends.

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 842
Gender Male
Decade of birth 1970
Educational attainment University
Age left school 17
Occupation Secondary teacher
Place of birth Aberdeen
Region of birth Aberdeen
Birthplace CSD dialect area Abd
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Aberdeen
Region of residence Aberdeen
Residence CSD dialect area Abd
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Offshore mechanical fitter
Father's place of birth Buckie
Father's region of birth Moray
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area Mry
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's occupation Housewife
Mother's place of birth Aberdeen
Mother's region of birth Aberdeen
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area Abd
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
English Yes Yes Yes Yes
Scots Yes Yes Yes Yes

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